Used Saddle Pick of the Week: 15″ Larry Coats Roping Saddle

December 5, 2011 by  
Filed under Used Saddle Pick of the Week

The “Used Saddle Pick of the Week”

But you’ll find more great
Roping Saddles for sale
in our Tack Shop

Every week we scour the Internet searching for a particularly juicy bargain on a high quality used western saddle and feature it here on the WSG Saddle Blog. The saddles featured are listed for sale on ebay as of the date of the post.

Checking out our Picks each week will give you some great insight into buying used saddles. Make sure to click through to the actual listing to see all of the photos and description from the seller.

The Western Saddle Guide is not the seller of the saddles featured and does not make any representations about them. We encourage all potential buyers to do their own due diligence on the seller and the saddle before purchasing.


LAST WEEK’S PICK:
Last week’s “Pick” was a vintage, but still solid, 15″ Hereford Trail Saddle. As with most older Herefords that are in good condition, this one was snapped up. It went for the “Buy it Now” price of $350.  The older Herefords have a well-deserved reputation for being a solid riding saddle.

THIS WEEK’S PICK:
Larry Coats Roping SaddleFor this week’s pick we’re highlighting a maker we haven’t featured before. Definitely an oversight. Larry Coats has been making quality custom saddles out of his shop in Wall, Texas for over 30 years. Coats Saddlery is best known for competition saddles (team roping, barrel racing, steer wrestling, etc.), and Larry knows that market well because he is a competitive team roper himself.

This week’s saddle is a 15″ Coats Roping Saddle that has barely been broken in. Definitely ridden by a cowboy who knew how to take care of a saddle.

This is a handsome saddle with basket weave tooling pattern and barbwire trim. The requisite roughout fenders, seat and front jockeys keep you anchored while roping. The gullet measures in at 7 inches.

The listing has a starting bid price of $2150 with no bids yet as of this writing. That may seem steep, but that’s a fair value for a used custom Coats saddle of this condition.  This is a great chance to get a custom quality saddle from a top maker at quite a discount. The seller is throwing in free shipping to sweeten the deal.

We Present the Saddle Blog’s Used Saddle of the Week:
15″ Coats Roping Saddle

Check out other Roping Saddles for sale in our tack shop.

Savior Saddle Racks

November 30, 2011 by  
Filed under Saddle Accessories

I’ve recently discovered a nifty saddle rack that is now a must-have in my tack room. The Savior Saddle Rack is a very creative design that creates a wonderful home for a valued saddle. It’s a bit pricey at $110, but it delivers a lot for the price.

  1. Curved to evenly support your saddle and help keep it’s shape.
  2. Made of aluminum so is lightweight and will never rust.
  3. Can be used with a stand or mounted on a fence, trailer, wall.
  4. Made in the U.S.

Too many saddles have their lives shortened due to poor care and storage practices. Seeing a saddle laying on the ground pains me. It’s always preferred to store a saddle on a saddle rack so that the saddle doesn’t get scrapped and the fenders, skirts and stirrups aren’t crushed.

A typical saddle rack does an adequate job, but the Savior Saddle Rack really takes care of a saddle.  My custom saddle now sits on a Savior Saddle Rack.

 

Used Saddle Pick of the Week: 15″ Hereford Trail Saddle

November 28, 2011 by  
Filed under Used Saddle Pick of the Week

The “Used Saddle Pick of the Week”

But you’ll find more great
Trail Saddles for sale
in our Tack Shop

Every week we scour the Internet searching for a particularly juicy bargain on a high quality used western saddle and feature it here on the WSG Saddle Blog. The saddles featured are listed for sale on ebay as of the date of the post.

Checking out our Picks each week will give you some great insight into buying used saddles. Make sure to click through to the actual listing to see all of the photos and description from the seller.

The Western Saddle Guide is not the seller of the saddles featured and does not make any representations about them. We encourage all potential buyers to do their own due diligence on the seller and the saddle before purchasing.


LAST WEEK’S PICK:
Last week’s “Pick” was a very nice 16″ McCall Lady Wade saddle. That listing is still live and has yet to receive a bid. I suspect that the seller’s starting bid price of $2200 is scaring folks away. A bit steep, but this saddle is a high quality saddle, and if you’re interested, I’d reach out to the seller to see if they’d entertain a lower bid. I’d recommend a bid in the $1800 rang.

THIS WEEK’S PICK:
Vintage Hereford Trail SaddleThe past two Picks have been at the higher end of the price scale, so this week we searched for a more affordable, but still quality, saddle to showcase. We found it with one of our go-to production brands – Textan’s Hereford brand. This quality brand has been around a long time, and the older models are the best models.

This week’s saddle is a 15″ Hereford Trail Saddle with some age to it. I’d guess it’s from around the 1960’s-70’s. It’s well broken in but still has a lot of riding hours left in it.

The saddle has full acorn tooling with a darker oil finish and probably semi-quarter horse bars. The saddle has been well cared for and probably has had less use than its age might suggest. The fleece is in good shape and there are no major wear marks.

The listing is a “Buy it Now”/ “Make an Offer” listing with a Buy it Now price of $350. The saddle is probably worth close to that price, but if you’re interested in this nice riding saddle, I’d try making an offer in the $275-$350 range and see if the seller will bite.

We Present the Saddle Blog’s Used Saddle of the Week:
15″ Textan Hereford Trail Saddle

Check out other Textan Saddles for sale in our tack shop.

Leather Dry Rot Blues

November 23, 2011 by  
Filed under Saddle Tips

I get quite a few questions about how to reclaim leather that is in sad shape. Unfortunately, it’s often just not reclaimable.

The tell tale sign of leather that is all used up is dry rot. Dry rot was originally defined as a type of decay in timber, but it is also used to describe the type of leather deterioration that occurs when internal moisture is lost.

The cause of leather dry rot is a lack of regular conditioning, which adds moisture back into the leather. It usually will take years of neglect for dry rot to occur, but in arid climates, where there is little moisture in the air, dry rot can develop in as little as a year.

How can you tell if your leather (saddle, headstall, reins, breast collar) has dry rot?  Bend the leather back as far as possible. If you see surface cracks or hear snapping or popping noises, it probably has dry rot.

Rotted leather has lost its strength and will rip relatively easily. There is no recovery. Don’t waste time trying to oil it back to health. You might be able to make it look better, but you won’t be able to repair the rot. Rotted leather is worthless leather, and dangerous leather. The only answer is replacement.

After reading this post, you might be tempted to start oiling your leather tack … a lot… and often. Restrain yourself. Too much oil can damage leather too, breaking down the fibers and weakening it. Oiling your saddle just once or twice a year (a little more in arid climates) will keep the dry rot gremlin away.

 

 

Used Saddle Pick of the Week: 16″ McCall Lady Wade Saddle

November 20, 2011 by  
Filed under Used Saddle Pick of the Week

The “Used Saddle Pick of the Week”

But you’ll find more great
McCall Saddles for sale
in our Tack Shop

Every week we scour the Internet searching for a particularly juicy bargain on a high quality used western saddle and feature it here on the WSG Saddle Blog. The saddles featured are listed for sale on ebay as of the date of the post.

Checking out our Picks each week will give you some great insight into buying used saddles. Make sure to click through to the actual listing to see all of the photos and description from the seller.

The Western Saddle Guide is not the seller of the saddles featured and does not make any representations about them. We encourage all potential buyers to do their own due diligence on the seller and the saddle before purchasing.


LAST WEEK’S PICK:
Our “Pick” from last week was a 16″ Trail Saddle from Martin Saddlery that is in great condition.  The listing is a “Buy it Now” listing  rather than an auction, and is still active as of this writing with a price of $1500. As I stated last week, this is a solid saddle that will last a long time. If you’re interested, see if the seller will take a lesser price

THIS WEEK’S PICK:
McCall Lady Wade SaddleThis week we’re really excited to have found a McCall saddle, our favorite production saddle brand. McCall saddles are very well made, and as close as you can get to the quality of a custom saddle maker from a production maker. Their specialty are Wade saddles, which we’re huge fans of.

McCall is a quality maker, not a quantity maker, so you don’t find many used McCalls for sale. And you find even fewer of their “Lady Wades” for sale. So when you find one, you need to be all over it.

This week’s saddle is a 16″ McCall Lady Wade with very few rides on it, and a real gem. Their Lady models are sized to female proportions (i.e. no ten feet long stirrup leathers!) and are a bit lighter than their regular Wades. McCall Wades, however, are substantial ranch saddles, so even the Lady Wades aren’t light saddles. But if you’re a gal looking for a saddle that will deliver an incredible ride, will position you in the correct riding position, and will last for generations, this is your saddle.

Now, let’s talk price. The McCall Lady Wade model is currently selling for $2800 new. The seller of this saddle has a starting bid of $2000 and a “Buy it Now” price of $2500. She’s dreaming. Just like new cars that lose a big chunk of value the minute you drive them off the lot, a used saddle will sell at a significant discount off the “new’ price. Because used McCalls are hard to come buy and have such a strong reputation, they’ll sell for a smaller discount then most other brands, but this seller is trying to recover almost all of the price she paid for it new. That’s unlikely to happen.

There’s a chance someone might jump at that price, but if you’re interested in this saddle, I’d try finding out if the seller might be interested at the $1800 price range. The listing doesn’t end until November 30th, so you may want to wait until closer to the close when she starts realizing she’s over priced her saddle.

Now, there just happens to be several other Lady McCalls listed for sale on ebay right now – Wades and Pendeltons (a Wade has a slick fork tree and a Pendelton has a  swell fork tree) and they’re all priced about the same.  Each one is in good shape and is a top notch saddle. So check out all of the  Used Lady McCall Saddles for Sale. You won’t typically see so many listed at one time.

We Present the Saddle Blog’s Used Saddle of the Week:
16″ McCall Lady Wade Saddle

Check out other Wade Saddles for sale in our tack shop.

Saddle Pad Storage: The Right Way

November 16, 2011 by  
Filed under Saddle Accessories, Saddle Tips

Does this sound familiar? You come in from a ride and unsaddle your horse. Your saddle pad is wet with your horse’s sweat, so you flip it upside down and place it on top of your saddle to dry out.

That’s what I used to do. That is, until I got a good talking to from a cowboy who knew better.

He told me there were two reasons why that technique was a really bad idea; bad for both the saddle, and the saddle pad.

  1. Leaving a sweat-soaked pad setting on a saddle allows the nasty sweat to permeate the saddle. There’s nothing about horse’s sweat that’s good for a saddle.
  2. Turning a saddle inside out does no good at all for a pad. You want your pad to conform to the shape of the horse’s back. Turning it inside out forms it into the opposite shape.

The best way to store a saddle pad – best for your pad, best for your saddle, and best for your horse – is to place it on a saddle pad rack.

Now, a “saddle pad rack” can be an official, store-bought, fancy-dancy saddle pad rack.  Or it can be any improvised rack – a fence rail, the back of a bench, a 2×4 hanging from a wall.  Be creative, but get that pad hanging on a rack.

Used Saddle Pick of the Week: 16″ Martin Trail Saddle

November 14, 2011 by  
Filed under Used Saddle Pick of the Week

The “Used Saddle Pick of the Week”

But you’ll find more great
Trail Saddles for sale
in our Tack Shop

Every week we scour the Internet searching for a particularly juicy bargain on a high quality used western saddle and feature it here on the WSG Saddle Blog. The saddles featured are listed for sale on ebay as of the date of the post.

Checking out our Picks each week will give you some great insight into buying used saddles. Make sure to click through to the actual listing to see all of the photos and description from the seller.

The Western Saddle Guide is not the seller of the saddles featured and does not make any representations about them. We encourage all potential buyers to do their own due diligence on the seller and the saddle before purchasing.


LAST WEEK’S PICK:
We chose a tried-and-true brand last week – a 16″ Hereford Trail Saddle  – that generated six bids. Unfortunately, the highest bid price of $275 didn’t meet the seller’s reserve price and the saddle went unsold. That’s two weeks in a row that the “Pick” didn’t meet the seller’s reserve. Seems sellers and buyers aren’t on the same page these days. ebay doesn’t show you what the reserve price is, so I don’t know how much the $275 was short, but I think this saddle would have been worth in the $350 range.

THIS WEEK’S PICK:
Used Martin Trail SaddleThis week we’ve chosen another trail saddle. Trail saddles are a very popular choice for many recreational riders.

This week’s saddle is a <>16″ Martin Trail Saddle. Martin Saddlery makes quality production saddles with high quality materials and construction methods. Martin saddles will have very long lives if well cared for. They’re best known for their competition saddles, but all of their saddles are solid.

This week’s saddle is a very well cared for saddle with few miles on it. The seller has done a great job of posting quite a few photos to really show off the saddle.

The listing for this saddle is set up as a “Buy it Now” or “Best Offer” auction, with a “Buy it Now” price of $1500. Now, this saddle is well over $2000 new, so I understand the seller’s reasoning, but I think he’s being a bit unrealistic as to what you can get on the used market these days.

So, if you’re looking for a quality trail saddle that will take care of you the rest of your riding days, I’d definitely look seriously at this saddle. But, use the “Make Offer” option and see if you can reach a deal with the seller at a bit more reasonable price.

We present the Saddle Blog’s Used Saddle of the Week:
<>16″ Martin Trail Saddle

Check out other Trail Saddles for sale in our tack shop.

Know Your Silver

November 11, 2011 by  
Filed under Saddle Parts, Saddle Tips

Silver is the metal of tradition and choice for saddle decoration and to draw the judge’s attention to you and your horse in the competition ring. However, just because your saddle has silvery metal on the skirt or horn doesn’t mean that it’s really silver. Before you buy a saddle with “silver,” make sure you know exactly what that “silver” is.

Bill Maloy Saddle (Courtesy of the Traditional Cowboy Arts Association (TCAA))

Saddle Silver usually will be one of the following four types, listed from least costly to most costly:

Silver Plating:  A thin layer of silver is electroplated to a base layer of another metal. This silver layering is inexpensive and looks great when it’s new, but it can wear off with repeated polishing and wear.

German Silver: Widely used in Western tack, it’s actually an alloy of nickel, copper, and sometimes zinc. The benefit? It oxidizes slowly and can stay clean without constant polishing that true silver requires.

San Simeon Silver: Contains 10% sterling silver for shine and durability at a reduced cost.

Sterling Silver: The 92.5 stamp marks the purest silver. It is generally considered to be the top of the line for shine. It’s expensive, and silver costs are rising. Sterling adds value to your saddle, but does require investment and upkeep time.

Saddle silversmiths have always been an integral part of the tradition and art of western craftsmanship including saddle trim, bits, spurs, belt buckles,

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